Discussion

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orbán: Europe's Solitary Defender of Persecuted Christians

Gatestone Institute - Sun, 2019-12-15 10:00
"Those we are helping now can give us the greatest help in saving Europe. We are giving persecuted Christians what they need: homes, hospitals, and schools, and we receive in return what Europe needs most: a Christian faith, love and perseverance". —
Categories: Discussion

Another Ignored Genocide of Christians Plagues Burkina Faso

Gatestone Institute - Sun, 2019-12-15 09:30
While a total of 12 Islamic terror attacks in Burkina Faso were registered in 2016, nearly 160 were reported in just the first five months of 2019. The situation has reached the point where... the mainstream media habitually downplay the religious
Categories: Discussion

Despots of the Square-Kilometer Empires

Gatestone Institute - Sun, 2019-12-15 09:00
The "Supreme Guide" is supposed to be excellent in everything. He has written on Islamic cuisine, the methodology of successful marriage, the destruction of Israel, the reform of human sciences, a new Islamic civilization to replace the old one that has
Categories: Discussion

Sweden: Confronting Reality

Gatestone Institute - Sat, 2019-12-14 10:00
One problem is that the Swedish state itself contributes indirectly to the spread of extremism. The Swedish Security Service (Säpo) has found that a "relatively large" number of organizations with links to violent extremism have been using Sweden's state
Categories: Discussion

Fighting assisted suicide and euthanasia in New York State. Conference - January 14.

Alex Schadenberg - Fri, 2019-12-13 21:03
The Euthanasia Prevention Coalition - USA and New York Against Assisted Suicide have a conference/training session at the Albany Statehouse (Albany NY)

Tuesday January 14, 2020 from 10:30 am to 2:30 pm.

 
Nancy ElliottMore details coming soon. 
The speakers include:

Alex Schadenberg, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition (EPC) Founder and Executive Director

Nancy Elliott, EPC-USA Chair and former three term New Hampshire State Representative.

Dr Paul SabaDr Paul Saba, co-founder and co-preseident of the Coalition of Physicians for Social Justice

Dawn Eskew, Founder, New York Against Assisted Suicide.

Register by emailing info@epcc.ca

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has said that he supports assisted suicide.

This event is will inform and activate New York citizens to defeat assisted suicide.

More information about assisted suicide.
Categories: Discussion

The Economist Swoons over Death Doctor & His Suicide Machine

Alex Schadenberg - Fri, 2019-12-13 20:34
This article was published by National Review online on December 13, 2019.

By Wesley Smith

The mainstream media mostly went head over heels over Jack Kevorkian’s ghoulish assisted suicide campaign, rarely mentioning that his ultimate goal was to gain the right to conduct human vivisection on people being euthanized.

The Australian Kevorkian — Philip Nitschke — hasn’t advocated that. But he has traveled the world teaching people how to commit suicide, published a suicide recipe he invented made of common household ingredients, and pushed a pernicious death-on-demand philosophy. Now The Economist swoons over “the bad boy of the euthanasia movement,” touting his new suicide pod machine in a profile of a length few presidents have received. From, “A Design for Death:” My host’s name is Philip Nitschke and he’s invented a machine called Sarco. Short for sarcophagus, the slick, spaceship-like pod has a seat for one passenger en-route to the afterlife. It uses nitrogen to enact a pain-free, peaceful death from inert-gas asphyxiation at the touch of a button. With the help of his wife and colleague, the writer and lawyer Dr Fiona Stewart, Nitschke is ushering the death-on-demand movement towards a dramatic new milestone – and their enthusiasm is palpable. And he’s such a jolly fellow! Nitschke and Stewart are much jollier than you’d expect the right-to-die movement’s only power couple to be. They’re full of – well – joie de vivre and arch banter about everything from Brexit to the roadworks that have denuded the front of their home of a beloved creeper. “If it’s not dead, boy is it doing a bloody good impression of being dead,” observes Nitschke, correctly. And he’s so good at the suicide sales pitch! It’s undeniable that Nitschke’s campaigns have exhibited a certain PR-savvy pizzazz. He is the originator, no less, of the euthanasia flash mob, which took place to celebrate his 70th birthday and 20 years of Exit International (soundtrack: Bon Jovi’s “It’s My Life”, naturally). When he announced plans for Sarco, it was dismissed by some, says Nitschke, as “a stunt, or some virtual creation in someone’s mind that didn’t have any prospect of physical reality.”

I can attest that the machine exists, having had the singular experience of reclining on a prototype at Nitschke’s workshop on an industrial estate in Hillegom, South Holland, amidst the incongruous spring blaze of the tulip fields. Plus, scratch the surface of his provocative patter and there’s a person – a patient – lurking behind each of his convictions. I think we should be very clear about who, exactly, The Economist is touting. Nitschke, the nihilist, told NRO’s Katherine Jean Lopez that he wants suicide pills made available in supermarkets. Katherine asked Nitschke whether they should be available to “troubled teens.” Why, yes, he said. From Katherine’s NRO interview: My personal position is that if we believe that there is a right to life, then we must accept that people have a right to dispose of that life whenever they want. (In the same way as the right to freedom of religion has implicit the right to be an atheist, and the right to freedom of speech involves the right to remain silent). I do not believe that telling people they have a right to life while denying them the means, manner, or information necessary for them to give this life away has any ethical consistency.

So all people qualify, not just those with the training, knowledge, or resources to find out how to “give away” their life. And someone needs to provide this knowledge, training, or recourse necessary to anyone who wants it, including the depressed, the elderly bereaved, [and] the troubled teen. If we are to remain consistent and we believe that the individual has the right to dispose of their life, we should not erect artificial barriers in the way of sub-groups who don’t meet our criteria. Nitschke has taught elderly people how to get animal euthanasia drugs to use on themselves. He has repeatedly lied about those he counseled on suicide, such as that of Nancy Crick, who Nitschke falsely claimed to the media that she had terminal cancer. Nitschke wasn’t near her when she died to avoid criminal his own culpability, but his fans were — and they applauded when she swallowed the pills. When I traveled to Australia in 2001 to expose him about the above-quoted interview with Katherine, he accused me of lying in the media. He also used to sell plastic suicide bags to suicidal people until stopped by the Australian government.

The man is thoroughly reprehensible. No wonder the mainstream media is attracted to him like a magnet to metal. They love their transgressives!
Categories: Discussion

Iran's Plan to Foil the Gaza Ceasefire

Gatestone Institute - Fri, 2019-12-13 10:00
The protesters are saying, in other words, that the Iranian people are fed up watching their country deliver hundreds of millions of dollars to Palestinian and Lebanese terrorist groups instead of improving the economic situation in Iran. Iran is
Categories: Discussion

Prison bars and jingle bells

Christian Ethics Today - Thu, 2019-12-12 19:06
Editor Patrick Anderson

By Pat Anderson
From December 2009

I brought 3-year-old Scruffy to the office today. This fine Cairn Terrier is a member of the family, primarily Sydney’s dog, but a member of the whole family.  The story below is how he came to be with us three years ago.  He is very happy today in the CBF office, and the staff seems to appreciate his networking spirit.
Pat Anderson

Except for a few years when our children were small, but even then deep down, I harbor an adult-long dislike for Christmas.  I don’t like the mythology of Santa, the reliance of the American economy on retailers’ success in wooing me to spend money on foolish things, the pressure of conflicted Christendom to “put Christ back in Christmas,” debates over nativity scenes in the public square and a supposed war on Christmas, gaudiness….I hate it all.  I hate the letdown after the mad rush of present opening on Christmas day….well, you know how I feel.

When Carolyn and I were paroled a few years ago from the prison of child-raising, we enjoyed the empty nest for a few short years by spending the Christmas season doing fun things like going to London one year, giving extra offerings to ministries for the poor, and thinking holy thoughts of righteous separation from the worldliness of Christmas.

Our parole was revoked and we were thrust back in the child-centered slammer,  at least for the time being, by our daughter’s divorce and her return home with her two little darlings, Sydney age 8 and Davis age 5.  Now we are into Christmas again, and despite all of my curmudgeon-ness, my old heart is softening.  Perhaps it was the 5-inch snowfall we had this weekend.  Maybe it is the music and hot chocolate with the added kick.   I cannot be sure, but I do feel my old frozen heart melting.

Davis is the biggest reason.  He is the first person I have encountered who really epitomizes the “spirit of Christmas”, if there is such a thing.  He snuggles really well for one thing, and all grandparents are suckers for snuggling grandchildren.  But the biggest quality he brings to the table is his genuinely selfless attitude.

I ask him “What do you want for Christmas, big guy?”   The question itself exposes my reversion to bad ol’ Christmases past, focusing our conversation on the evil subject of material expectations, something I had sworn off.  But he just shrugs and says “I don’t know” with an air of disinterest, a detachment which I have not seen in the other children in my life.  Then, he says, “I want Sydney to have a puppy.”

Well, that just about does me in.  He knows his big sister is having a hard time with the family reorganization.  He talks with her in privileged conversations only siblings can have and he knows how lonely she feels sometimes, and he hears her frequent longing for a dog of her own, a pet to snuggle with, shower with affection, and talk to.  More than anything, Davis wants his sister to be happy.

Davis has spent the past two days with his Gram working on a special handmade card for Syd,   He selected buttons from Gram’s stash and ribbon carefully chosen for color and texture.  He picked his favorite sharpies and created a drawing of a house with a door that opens onto the sight of a Christmas tree, decorated in his own artistic style.  He thinks day and night of trying to make his sister happy.  He is sure this hand crafted card will please her, and he works hard at keeping his efforts secret so she will be properly surprised.  His creative juices are flowing.  He is the happiest kid I know as he puts all his creative energy in the special card.

Well, we got Sydney a puppy. His name is Scruffy. I am now in the Christmas spirit (whatever that is).  Davis has won me over.  Maybe the sound I hear is not the prison bars clanging shut but the jingle bells in the melting snow of my heart.

Categories: Discussion

BC Health Minister says he will force the Delta Hospice to kill.

Alex Schadenberg - Thu, 2019-12-12 17:34
Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director - Euthanasia Prevention Coalition
Sign the petition: Hospice Organizations Must NOT be Forced to do Euthanasia (Link).
The BC Health Minister, Adrian Dix, declared yesterday that the BC government will take action if the Delta hospice refuses to kill its patients.

Adrian Dix has suggested that they will close the 10 bed Delta Hospice if it refuses to kill.

On December 2, I reported that the Board of the Delta BC Hospice Society that operates the Irene Thomas Hospice in Ladner BC, renewed its position opposing euthanasia (MAiD) while supporting excellent care. The Board stated:
MAiD is not compatible with the Delta Hospice Society purposes stated in the society's constitution, and therefore, will not be performed at the Irene Thomas Hospice.In its recent Call to Action, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association and the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians stated that MAiD (euthanasia) is not part of hospice palliative care. They stated:
MAiD is not part of hospice palliative care; it is not an “extension” of palliative care nor is it one of the tools “in the palliative care basket”. National and international hospice palliative care organizations are unified in the position that MAiD is not part of the practice of hospice palliative care. ...Hospice palliative care sees dying as a normal part of life and helps people to live and die well. Hospice palliative care does not seek to hasten death or intentionally end life. The Delta Optimist newpaper reported, on December 7, that Fraser Health informed the Delta Hospice that their position is at odds with the policy of Fraser Health. A spokesperson for Fraser Health told the Delta Optimist that:
The region noted it fully supports a patient’s right to receive medical assistance in dying wherever they may be, including in a hospice setting.The position of the Delta Hospice is not new. In February 2018, the Delta Hospice was ordered by Fraser Health to provide euthanasia. The Delta Hospice did not comply with the Fraser Health edict.

If the Delta Hospice closes, the residents of Delta will lose the 10 bed hospice that is known for providing excellent end-of-life care.
If the Delta Hospice is forced to do euthanasia, then all Canadian Hospice groups will be forced to do euthanasia.
Sign the petition: Hospice Organizations Must NOT be Forced to do Euthanasia (Link).
Categories: Discussion

Disability Activist Anita Cameron To Speak At Congressional Briefing On Assisted Suicide

Alex Schadenberg - Thu, 2019-12-12 15:00

Link to the article published by Not Dead Yet.

Bipartisan Resolution Opposing Assisted Suicide Laws Reintroduced

Anita CameronAnita Cameron, director of minority outreach for Not Dead Yet, will speak at a Congressional briefing to be held Thursday, December 12, 2019 in Room 2168 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

The briefing is cosponsored by the National Council on Disability (NCD), Congressman Lou Correa (D-CA) and Congressman Brad Wenstrup (R-OH). This briefing will explore the findings and recommendations of a recent federal study of the country’s assisted suicide laws and their effect on access to health care and other dangers for people with disabilities.

The briefing coincides with this week’s reintroduction of a bipartisan House resolution,
“Expressing the sense of the Congress that assisted suicide (sometimes referred to using other terms) puts everyone, including those most vulnerable, at risk of deadly harm.”Representative Correa is the lead sponsor, joined by Representative Wenstrup, and additional original cosponsors are Rep. James Langevin (D-RI), Rep. Andy Harris, M.D. (R-MD), Rep. Daniel Lipinski (D-IL), Rep. Darin LaHood (R-IL), Rep. Collin Peterson (D-MN), Rep. Ralph Abraham, M.D. (R-LA), Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ), Rep. Ann Wagner (R-MO), and Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-PA).

Cameron has often spoken of the risks posed to people of color if assisted suicide becomes normalized in our healthcare system. 
“Due to racial disparities, Blacks and people of color receive inferior healthcare compared to Whites, especially in cardiac care, diabetes and pain management. Blacks are diagnosed with cancer at much later stages and the prognosis is worse,” Cameron says. “With so much documented healthcare injustice, we should not grant the system a greater license to kill.”Diane ColemanNDY’s president and CEO, Diane Coleman, also provided a statement in support of the resolution: 
“As a national, secular, social justice organization, Not Dead Yet strongly supports this bipartisan effort to speak truth to counter the many myths about legalized assisted suicide. As Americans with disabilities, we are on the front lines of the nation’s health care system that too often devalues old, ill, and disabled people. We are deeply concerned that profits are being prioritized over human needs. So we are grateful for this Sense of Congress that explains the dangers of mistake, coercion, and abuse under a public policy of assisted suicide.”Additional national disability organizations issuing statements this week supporting the resolution include ADAPT, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund and the National Council on Independent Living.
Categories: Discussion

Iran fills the Vacuum Created by Trump's Withdrawal

Gatestone Institute - Thu, 2019-12-12 10:00
President Trump has hastened the withdrawal of American forces from Syria, and is actively seeking to reduce America's military presence elsewhere in the region, with troop withdrawals under active consideration in countries such as Iraq and Afghanistan.
Categories: Discussion

Is NATO Still Vital?

Gatestone Institute - Thu, 2019-12-12 09:30
Many additional countries who joined the alliance -- such as Poland, Hungary and the Baltic States, which had been Soviet satellites -- still consider post-Communist Russia an extremely disquieting potential threat. That is just one issue that has
Categories: Discussion

Cannabis and Driving: How Safe Are You?

Gatestone Institute - Thu, 2019-12-12 09:00
Gatestone's 2020 Conference on the Effects of Marijuana. Details coming soon.
Categories: Discussion

Delta Hospice Must Not Be Forced to do Euthanasia.

Alex Schadenberg - Wed, 2019-12-11 20:07
Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director, Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

In February 2018 the Board of the Delta BC Hospice was given an Edict from Fraser Health to provide euthanasia (MAiD).

At that time, the Board of the Delta Hospice decided not to do euthanasia and continued its good work.
Sign the petition to Dr Victoria Lee, President of Fraser Health Authority and Adrian Dix, the BC Minister of Health, stating: Hospice Organizations Must NOT be forced to do Euthanasia (Link).Recently, the Board of the Delta Hospice re-stated its opposition to euthanasia. The new board passed a resolution stating:
MAiD is not compatible with the Delta Hospice Society purposes stated in the society's constitution, and therefore, will not be performed at the Irene Thomas Hospice.A spokesperson for Fraser Health told the Delta Optimist that:
it fully supports a patient’s right to receive medical assistance in dying wherever they may be, including in a hospice setting.The order by Fraser Health is contrary to the stated purpose of the Delta Hospice Society constitution.
Sign the petition: Hospice Organizations Must NOT be forced to do Euthanasia (Link).If funding for the 10 bed hospice is stopped people in the community requiring care at the end of life, will lose the excellent care provided by the Delta Hospice.

By forcing the Delta Hospice to provide euthanasia, Fraser Health is also redefining the meaning of hospice/palliative care.

In its recent Call to Action, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association and the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians stated that MAiD (euthanasia) is not a part of hospice palliative care. They stated:MAiD is not part of hospice palliative care; it is not an “extension” of palliative care nor is it one of the tools “in the palliative care basket”. National and international hospice palliative care organizations are unified in the position that MAiD is not part of the practice of hospice palliative care. ...Hospice palliative care sees dying as a normal part of life and helps people to live and die well. Hospice palliative care does not seek to hasten death or intentionally end life. If the Delta Hospice is forced to provide euthanasia then all Hospice Palliative Care organizations within Canada can be forced to provide euthanasia.

Hospice/Palliative Care is not MAiD. The Delta Hospice must not be forced to provide MAiD.

Fraser Health is overstepping its role as a health authority in forcing and bullying the Delta Hospice to provide MAiD.
Sign the petition: Hospice Organizations Must NOT be forced to do Euthanasia (Link).
Categories: Discussion

How Should the Senate Deal with an Unconstitutional Impeachment by the House?

Gatestone Institute - Wed, 2019-12-11 19:00
These two grounds [of impeachment] — abuse of power and obstruction of congress — are not among the criteria specified for impeachment. Neither one is a high crime and misdemeanor. Neither is mentioned in the constitution. Both are the sort of vague,
Categories: Discussion

‘I don’t want a baby like that’

Christian Medical Fellowship - Wed, 2019-12-11 14:37

The Sunday Times this weekend reported that ‘the number of babies born with Down’s syndrome has fallen by 30% in NHS hospitals that have introduced a new form of screening.’

This new test, NIPT (non- invasive prenatal testing), is safer than amniocentesis, but Down syndrome campaigners, including the actress Sally Phillips, have serious concerns both about the fact of its existence and about the misinformation surrounding it.

In a guest lecture for Theos last week, Phillips revealed that the cost of the NIPT test is around £400 per woman but carries little public benefit. In a tweet commenting on the Times article, Phillips added that the ASA has recently ruled that the accuracy claims made about the test were misleading. Most people reading the advertising, it held, would understand that the test was 99% accurate in detecting Down syndrome in the fetus, but this is not true. Phillips states that while it may be 99% accurate in women over 46, ‘in a woman of 25 it has a positive predictive value of [just] 46%.

The cost and accuracy of the test are only part of the problem, however. Phillips and others are far more concerned by the message the test sends in its very existence. As the Times article points out,

Colette Lloyd, 46, who obtained the figures, said she would struggle to explain to her daughter, Katie, 22, who has Down’s, how the test could be justified. She said: “How would I tell her, ‘We have a test so that women can make a choice of whether they want to keep a baby like you or not’? It is not a pro-choice or pro-life thing at all. It is the woman saying: ‘I want a baby, but I don’t want a baby like that.’”

A press release from the campaign organisation ‘Don’t Screen Us Out’ states that

The Government have previously admitted that no assessment was made of the impact that the roll-out of [NIPT] will have on the lives of people with Down’s syndrome. In an answer to a parliamentary question the Department of Health confirmed that “…no assessment was made of the impact of NIPT on the number of abortions, Down’s Syndrome community and medical professional and society’s attitudes towards people with Down’s syndrome.”

Screening can be useful in order to help parents prepare for the birth of a child who may need extra care, enabling them to access information and support ahead of time – and avoiding the ‘shock factor’ that Phillips described in her Theos lecture once the baby has arrived. But in a culture where, as Phillips also outlined, the diagnosis of Down syndrome is often seen as a devastating tragedy, it is inevitable that some expectant parents will opt to remove the issue instead of preparing for it.

Our cultural narrative of inclusion, acceptance and the celebration of diversity is revealed to be nothing but empty words when we develop and promote tests whose foreseeable consequence is the elimination of people with certain types of diversity. That the birth rate of babies with Down syndrome has already fallen by 30% in hospitals where the test has been rolled out simply confirms campaigners’ fears.

NIPT is mis-sold, expensive and, more importantly, unnecessary.

Categories: Discussion

Spain's 'Migrant Friendly' Border Fences

Gatestone Institute - Wed, 2019-12-11 10:00
Critics say that the razor wire functions as a significant deterrent to illegal immigration and that by removing it, the Spanish government not only risks unleashing new waves of mass migration from Africa, but also gives effective control of the Spanish
Categories: Discussion

Turkey: Murder of Women Reaches Epidemic Proportions

Gatestone Institute - Wed, 2019-12-11 09:00
The cause of 50% of the killings was not determined, but 16% of the women were killed because they wanted to make decisions about their lives, such as wanting a divorce, rejecting offers of reconciliation or even for not answering the phone when called
Categories: Discussion

Western Australia Legalizes Lethal Injection Euthanasia

Alex Schadenberg - Wed, 2019-12-11 01:55
This article was published by National Review online on December 10, 2019.

Wesley SmithBy Wesley J Smith

The euthanasia darkness seeps into Western Australia. From the Australian Broadcasting Corporation story:Under the scheme, to be eligible a person would have to be terminally ill with a condition that is causing intolerable suffering and is likely to cause death within six months, or 12 months for a neurodegenerative condition. A person would have to make two verbal requests and one written request. Those requests would have to be signed off by two doctors who are independent of each other. The choice of lethal medication would be a clinical decision from an approved list of drugs. Self-administration would be the preferred method, but in a departure from the Victorian regime, a patient could choose for a medical practitioner to administer the drug.“Intolerable suffering” has no objective test. It is whatever a patient says it is — even if the illness is not the reason for the suicide/homicide request.

Where will this lead? Over time, into the bottomless moral pit into which the Netherlands, Belgium, and increasingly Canada have already jumped.

I can’t escape the irony that people seem to lack faith in doctors to care for patients properly and ameliorate their suffering, but ironically, will allow these same doctors to kill them. Bizarre.
Categories: Discussion

Delta Hospice ordered by Fraser Health to do euthanasia.

Alex Schadenberg - Tue, 2019-12-10 22:03
Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director - Euthanasia Prevention Coalition
Delta HospiceOn December 2, I reported that the Board of the Delta BC Hospice Society that operates the Irene Thomas Hospice in Ladner BC, renewed its position opposing euthanasia (MAiD) while supporting excellent care. The Board stated that:
MAiD is not compatible with the Delta Hospice Society purposes stated in the society's constitution, and therefore, will not be performed at the Irene Thomas Hospice.Fraser Health, the government agency that allocates health funding in that region reacted to the Delta Hospice Society by ordering them to provide MAiD (euthanasia). 

The Delta Optimist newpaper reported, on December 7, that Fraser Health informed the Delta Hospice that their position is at odds with the policy of Fraser Health.

A spokesperson for Fraser Health told the Delta Optimist that:
The region noted it fully supports a patient’s right to receive medical assistance in dying wherever they may be, including in a hospice setting.
The Delta Optimist also reported that the lobby group, Dying With Dignity, also believes that the Delta Hospice should be forced to do euthanasia:
Alex Muir with the Vancouver chapter of Dying with Dignity Canada called the new board’s vote to repeal MAiD disappointing, adding his group believes Delta Hospice should be forced to abide by Fraser Health policy that MAiD be provided in all non-faith-based facilities under its jurisdiction.

Muir then added that Dying With Dignity considers palliative care and MAiD to be essential options on a spectrum of care.
Delta Hospice President, Angelina IrelandThe position of the Delta Hospice is not new. In February 2018, the Delta Hospice was ordered by Fraser Health to provide euthanasia. The Delta Hospice did not comply with the edict from Fraser Health at that time.

Recently the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association (CHPCA) and the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians released a joint statement upholding that hospice palliative care is not compatible with MAiD (euthanasia). They stated:
Healthcare articles and the general media continue to conflate and thus misrepresent these two fundamentally different practices. MAiD is not part of hospice palliative care; it is not an “extension” of palliative care nor is it one of the tools “in the palliative care basket”. National and international hospice palliative care organizations are unified in the position that MAiD is not part of the practice of hospice palliative care.

Hospice palliative care and MAiD substantially differ in multiple areas including in philosophy, intention and approach. Hospice palliative care focuses on improving quality of life and symptom management through holistic person-centered care for those living with life threatening conditions. Hospice palliative care sees dying as a normal part of life and helps people to live and die well. Hospice palliative care does not seek to hasten death or intentionally end life.
If the Delta Hospice is forced to do euthanasia, then all Canadian Hospice groups can be forced to do euthanasia.
Categories: Discussion

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